Homemade Roll out Fondant Icing Recipe

Homemade Roll out Fondant Icing Recipe | The fondant created with this recipe is soft and pliable, with just the right amount of stretch, it is perfect for sealing and decorating cakes. The fondant will store for a couple of weeks in a sealed container in the fridge or freezer. I also use it for some modelled flowers and to model figures. |https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe | https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe/

The fondant created with this recipe is soft and pliable, with just the right amount of stretch, it is perfect for sealing and decorating cakes. The fondant will store for a couple of weeks in a sealed container in the fridge or freezer.
I also use it for some modelled flowers and to model figures.
For flowers, you should use modelling paste, flower paste or Mexican paste, but I occasionally get lazy and find it works surprisingly well with a pinch of tylose and a small amount of vegetable shortening. A ratio of 4:1 fondant to Mexican paste makes excellent paste for sculpting super detailed figures.

Homemade Roll out Fondant Icing Recipe | The fondant created with this recipe is soft and pliable, with just the right amount of stretch, it is perfect for sealing and decorating cakes. I also use it for some modelled flowers and to model figures. |https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe | https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe/

On a side note, the weather gets pretty interesting December through to February in Australia. As a general rule do not try to cover a very cold cake straight from the fridge with fondant on humid or overly hot days and never with an evaporative air conditioner in operation as the extra moisture in the air will turn your icing to slush.  All the cakes pictured on this post have been decorated using my homemade fondant recipe.

The best tip for perfect fondant every time is weigh everything, this removes the variation and ensures consistent results. Due to differences in eggs and how compact the icing sugar is in the cup measure, I was getting mixed results until I started weighing the ingredients and recording results.
Weigh everything, it is the key to making a consistent product.
Using actiwhite powdered egg whites also produces a more uniform product that is shelf stable with none of the potential issues of fresh egg whites, but I still use fresh egg whites for family cakes if I have them left over in the fridge. Fondant made with powdered whites and stored in an airtight container will last a very, very long time in the fridge and even longer if vacuum sealed and stored in the freezer.

Recipe Below

Rollout Fondant Icing Recipe

Homemade Roll out Fondant Icing Recipe | The fondant created with this recipe is soft and pliable, with just the right amount of stretch, it is perfect for sealing and decorating cakes. I also use it for some modelled flowers and to model figures. |https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe | https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe/

Ingredients

1.5kg grams of pure icing sugar, sifted.

84 grams of egg white or dried egg white powder and water equivalent (I prefer to use Actiwhite powdered egg whites). Pasteurised egg whites are another good option (84 grams works out to roughly 3 medium egg whites).

2 teaspoons of liquid glycerine – Buy from a cake supplies shop or Pharmacy if not available at the supermarket.

180g of light corn syrup or liquid glucose, I use Corn Syrup, it gives a stretchier, smoother finish.

2-3 heaped tablespoons of solid vegetable shortening like crisco

3 teaspoons of Tylose powder, add another 1/4 to half a teaspoon if the fondant is too soft.

Icing sugar for dusting and rolling.

Gel food colouring-  get a concentrate, paste or even a powder. I use Americolor Gel Colour. Cheap supermarket food colours are too watery and weakly coloured.

1/4 teaspoon Queen concentrated natural vanilla extract, I don’t mind the very slight colour it gives, I prefer the flavour and it is very thick so it doesn’t affect the texture too much. Almond or any other colourless essence works as well.

Small batch ingredient quantities:

500g pure icing sugar – sifted
28g egg whites
60g Corn syrup
1 teaspoon CMC or Tylose powder
1-2 tablespoons of crisco or similar solid vegetable shortening
1/2 teaspoon of Glycerine

Thrifty Tip:
Karo corn syrup is great, but you can find Korean corn syrup at your local Asian Grocer for a lot less, I buy 5 litres for $15.

My wedding cake | Homemade Roll out Fondant Icing Recipe | The fondant created with this recipe is soft and pliable, with just the right amount of stretch, it is perfect for sealing and decorating cakes. I also use it for some modelled flowers and to model figures. |https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe | https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe/Method

If using glucose, warm it gently in a microwave for a few seconds or by standing the jar in hot water for a minute.

Glucose does not work well in this recipe find corn syrup or you’ll have to adjust the amount of egg white.

Sift icing sugar and tylose into a bowl.

Make a well in the Icing sugar and then pour in the syrup, glycerine and egg white. Mix with a blunt metal butter knife, (I mix with one of these but feel free to use whatever you prefer) until as much of the wet mix has been combined as possible without having to exert too much force.

Transfer mixture and all of the not yet combined icing sugar onto a bench smeared with crisco or vegetable shortening and knead all together until smooth and mouldable, this takes a lot of effort.

Add a few drops of colour and essence now then knead through.

Once the mixture is well combined, knead the remaining shortening into the fondant then and alternate between stretching and kneading the fondant like toffee until the texture is perfect.

Cover in cling film and set aside for 20 minutes before using, keep wrapped until ready to use. After resting, cool fondant sometimes loses its stretchiness, pop it in the microwave for 10-15 seconds and knead it with a tiny amount of crisco until it is stretchy again.

Lightly dust your work surface with icing sugar before rolling out. If the fondant becomes dry or brittle or forms a rough crocodile-like skin when rolled out, it can be refreshed by working in a tiny amount of shortening, smear it very thinly on the work surface and knead it through.

Homemade Roll out Fondant Icing Recipe | The fondant created with this recipe is soft and pliable, with just the right amount of stretch, it is perfect for sealing and decorating cakes. I also use it for some modelled flowers and to model figures. |https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe | https://robertscakesandcooking.com/homemade-fondant-icing-recipe/I have had a lot of success using this mixture for basic figures and modelling. For finer work and models, add about 1/2 teaspoon of tylose for every 300g of fondant, you can refresh the mix with a tiny amount of shortening or a very tiny amount of water if it begins to dry out  too quickly.

***To make a large amount of jet black or deep red fondant, make a big mixture using 1.5kg of icing sugar, use powdered eggwhite and replace 2 tablespoons of the liquid with Americolor Super Black or Super Red and lower the amount of glycerine slightly. Sift the icing sugar and tylose into a bowl, make a well in the centre, pour in the food dye actiwhite mix and the other ingredients and continue as above. The colour will continue to develop over the space of an hour or so and with further kneading. Once the cake is covered, rubbing a thin layer of crisco into the fondant will give it a nice shiny, smooth surface and darken the colour, the crisco will be absorbed over a few hours and leave a satiny, less shiny finish but it’s worth doing as it really deepens the colours.

Powdered colours will also produce very vibrant colour, but work out too expensive if you are making a lot of dark or vibrantly coloured fondant. Smaller amounts can be coloured from white to very dark by balancing the amount of liquid added from the gel paste colour with tylose or CMC.

This is my modern update of a tried and tested old-fashioned fondant recipe.

Well prepared fruitcake, painted with alcohol, sealed with marzipan and fondant can keep for years. I wouldn’t eat the icing after that much time… but the underlying cake is very well preserved… if you’re brave…. My Christmas cakes are usually kept in cellophane until ready to be eaten, this can be up to a month, once opened I keep them in a sealed container. Also, once completely dried out, figures and sculptures made with this fondant will last practically forever.

Here is the whole process start to finish in 10 minutes:

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    • Linda Renaud on 8 June 2016 at 6:56 pm
    • Reply

    Hi, I was looking at your fondant recipe and noticed meringue powder. Why use meringue powder (which is normally used in royal icing) in fondant?

    1. Egg white helps the fondant to set/dry a little quicker and improves the texture. I’ve got the meringue powder listed just as an option if you have it on hand because it will work exactly the same as egg white.
      I actually prefer using the egg white powder, as it is less wasteful and I always keep it on hand. I use pasteurised or powdered egg whites for anything not for immediate family if the product is not going to be heated.
      For my immediate family’s fondant covered cakes, I will occasionally use raw whites, the sugar preserves them, our eggs are always super fresh and produced using good practices. My Mum uses “raw” egg whites for her fondant covered Christmas fruitcakes, these fondant covered cakes last months. Eggs in Australia don’t have the kinds of issues that eggs in other countries have, but I still prefer the egg white powder in general.

    • Qasim Zaffar on 22 September 2018 at 10:30 pm
    • Reply

    Hi Robert. Is pure icing sugar the same thing as confectioner’s/icing sugar that we get around the world (with 3.something % of corn starch in it) or is it just purely powdered sugar? Would love to try your recipe!

    1. Hi Qasim,
      Pure is just sugar, you want to avoid the mixes that have tapioca or corn starch, they mess with the balance of the recipe and the % of starch changes a lot depending on the brand. If you can find pure powdered sugar give this recipe a go, you can really change the texture and usefulness of the fondant just by adjusting fat and tylose. Add more tylose to make a firmer fondant that will set faster and hold it’s shape better. Add more fat and tylose together for a smoother, softer finish, longer working time and more stretch.

        • Qasim on 21 October 2018 at 7:20 am
        • Reply

        Thanks for replying. Will be trying this recipe tonight.

    • Anonymous on 5 October 2018 at 1:16 pm
    • Reply

    Hello. I am thinking of adding lemon juice to cut down the sweetness. Have you ever done This? Will it affect the meringue powder?

    1. It should be fine, but sift the egg white powder in with the icing sugar and add the lemon juice to the same weight you would have used to re-hydrate the whites in with the corn syrup. Knead it all together, then let it rest and hour and reknead it.
      The lemon juice added straight to the whites at the beginning might cook the egg proteins and prevent them from being stretchy and smooth when the liquid is added. Adding them separately and letting the white rehydrate after kneading will prevent this issue. I often add cream of tartar to the icing sugar because the slight sourness it adds cuts the sweetness slightly.
      I have also added fine salt to it to balance the flavour, with a little vinegar and the oil from orange or lemon rind. But salt needs to be balanced by extra fat or the fondant will dry out way too fast. 🙂

        • Anonymous on 9 October 2018 at 3:46 pm
        • Reply

        Thanks a mil

    • Ramat on 19 October 2018 at 3:54 pm
    • Reply

    Thank you for this recipes, how many more minutes do I need to knead more before it gets stretchy. 2ndly how do I prevent cracks when rolling out the fondant to cover a cake.
    Thank you.

    1. It usually takes a few minutes of kneading for the fondant to get stretchy, If it’s not stretchy enough add a little more fat and knead again, or warm for 10 seconds in a microwave as it will knead and come together better when it is slightly warm.
      To prevent cracks, increase the amount of fat used, don’t roll out with cornflour, instead use icing sugar, as it will be less likely to result in a a dry cracking surface. Generally, dramatically increasing the amount of fat will result in a longer working time and a smoother finish.

    • Anonymous on 27 November 2018 at 2:28 am
    • Reply

    Hello, thanks in advance for your expertise/time. Your recipe does not use gelatin like most traditional ones, any ideas on the pros/cons of this on tje final product?

    1. Hi,
      Yup removing gelatine makes it a much faster product to make and removes the variance in different types of gelatine and any issues that might occur from the heating and melting of the gelatine. The egg white powder does all the same things the gelatine would do without the fuss. This fondant has a very long shelf life and can be more easily amended by adding more fat or adding more tylose to make it work to suit your needs and working style.

  1. […] result. However for very dark colours like  bright reds or black it helps to mix in a bit of homemade fondant and a small amount of tylose to further stabilise the mixture. This way the chocolate can take a lot […]

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